Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

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Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

chris english-2
My wife showed me a beading pattern that she was working on that looks to
my eye like a hexagonal grid, its called a peyote stitch, and she needs to
transform it to a loom stitch, essentially a raster. In the beading world
they suggest combining two rows into one. If asked, what have you tried, I
would say I tried to duck, but... In practical application, the two rows
equals one doesn't appear to preserve the desired pattern when beading the
loom, probably something like netting out the half-steps when you're going
from two rows to one = n+1 or n +2 for bead count on the combined row.
40x40 hex grid, OK, I'll get out my graph paper. Summer.

Thank you for your forbearance, and any very general thoughts appreciated,
ie transforms sans datums & etc.

Chris

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Re: Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

Ben Tupper
If I were in your shoes I would be doing a hop-skip to ring Sarah Goslee's doorbell.  She's our resident ecology-spatial-textiles guru...

http://www.stringpage.com/ <http://www.stringpage.com/>







> On Jul 29, 2018, at 12:26 AM, chris english <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> My wife showed me a beading pattern that she was working on that looks to
> my eye like a hexagonal grid, its called a peyote stitch, and she needs to
> transform it to a loom stitch, essentially a raster. In the beading world
> they suggest combining two rows into one. If asked, what have you tried, I
> would say I tried to duck, but... In practical application, the two rows
> equals one doesn't appear to preserve the desired pattern when beading the
> loom, probably something like netting out the half-steps when you're going
> from two rows to one = n+1 or n +2 for bead count on the combined row.
> 40x40 hex grid, OK, I'll get out my graph paper. Summer.
>
> Thank you for your forbearance, and any very general thoughts appreciated,
> ie transforms sans datums & etc.
>
> Chris
>
> [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> _______________________________________________
> R-sig-Geo mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-sig-geo
>

Ben Tupper
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
60 Bigelow Drive, P.O. Box 380
East Boothbay, Maine 04544
http://www.bigelow.org

Ecological Forecasting: https://eco.bigelow.org/






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Re: Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

chris english-2
Thank you Ben!, I'll actually send her directly
to Sarah, http://www.sarahgoslee.com/ .
Dr. Massa, meet Dr. Goslee, Professor of indeterminate studies & weaver,
and writer,
Dr. Goslee, meet Dr. Massa, cognitive neuro research scientist, felter and
loom beader.
Thanks again,
Chris

On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 9:12 AM, Ben Tupper <[hidden email]> wrote:

> If I were in your shoes I would be doing a hop-skip to ring Sarah Goslee's
> doorbell.  She's our resident ecology-spatial-textiles guru...
>
> http://www.stringpage.com/
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 29, 2018, at 12:26 AM, chris english <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> My wife showed me a beading pattern that she was working on that looks to
> my eye like a hexagonal grid, its called a peyote stitch, and she needs to
> transform it to a loom stitch, essentially a raster. In the beading world
> they suggest combining two rows into one. If asked, what have you tried, I
> would say I tried to duck, but... In practical application, the two rows
> equals one doesn't appear to preserve the desired pattern when beading the
> loom, probably something like netting out the half-steps when you're going
> from two rows to one = n+1 or n +2 for bead count on the combined row.
> 40x40 hex grid, OK, I'll get out my graph paper. Summer.
>
> Thank you for your forbearance, and any very general thoughts appreciated,
> ie transforms sans datums & etc.
>
> Chris
>
> [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> _______________________________________________
> R-sig-Geo mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-sig-geo
>
>
> Ben Tupper
> Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
> 60 Bigelow Drive
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=60+Bigelow+Drive&entry=gmail&source=g>, P.O.
> Box 380
> East Boothbay, Maine 04544
> http://www.bigelow.org
>
> Ecological Forecasting: https://eco.bigelow.org/
>
>
>
>
>
>

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Re: Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

Sarah Goslee
Hi!

I nearly didn't open this email thread: glad I did!

I have some odd R tools for weaving, but nothing for beading.

I suspect this is the best way to do it, although the actual result
would depend on the particular pattern.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art61406.asp

Whether it's worth writing R code to perform this task depends a lot
on how many patterns need to be converted.

A more R-geo approach might be to import the original pattern from an
image file, turn it into spatial polygons, then rasterize it,
completely ignoring the hexagonal nature of the original. With some
playing with the raster grid size, you could probably get a decent
approximation.

Sarah


On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 10:40 AM, chris english
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Thank you Ben!, I'll actually send her directly
> to Sarah, http://www.sarahgoslee.com/ .
> Dr. Massa, meet Dr. Goslee, Professor of indeterminate studies & weaver,
> and writer,
> Dr. Goslee, meet Dr. Massa, cognitive neuro research scientist, felter and
> loom beader.
> Thanks again,
> Chris
>
> On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 9:12 AM, Ben Tupper <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> If I were in your shoes I would be doing a hop-skip to ring Sarah Goslee's
>> doorbell.  She's our resident ecology-spatial-textiles guru...
>>
>> http://www.stringpage.com/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jul 29, 2018, at 12:26 AM, chris english <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> My wife showed me a beading pattern that she was working on that looks to
>> my eye like a hexagonal grid, its called a peyote stitch, and she needs to
>> transform it to a loom stitch, essentially a raster. In the beading world
>> they suggest combining two rows into one. If asked, what have you tried, I
>> would say I tried to duck, but... In practical application, the two rows
>> equals one doesn't appear to preserve the desired pattern when beading the
>> loom, probably something like netting out the half-steps when you're going
>> from two rows to one = n+1 or n +2 for bead count on the combined row.
>> 40x40 hex grid, OK, I'll get out my graph paper. Summer.
>>
>> Thank you for your forbearance, and any very general thoughts appreciated,
>> ie transforms sans datums & etc.
>>
>> Chris
>>

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Re: Transform hexagonal to raster - a wife's question

chris english-2
Sarah,

I'll try the R-geo approach suggested for a small, sought after kokopeli,
and duck an integrated raster colorizer (five years to proto-type given my
skills.) I've forwarded all this to Dr Massa. I would say though that things
'loom' tend to work both for fabric and bead. Glad you checked the thread.

Happy summer,
Chris

On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 12:53 PM, Sarah Goslee <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Hi!
>
> I nearly didn't open this email thread: glad I did!
>
> I have some odd R tools for weaving, but nothing for beading.
>
> I suspect this is the best way to do it, although the actual result
> would depend on the particular pattern.
>
> http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art61406.asp
>
> Whether it's worth writing R code to perform this task depends a lot
> on how many patterns need to be converted.
>
> A more R-geo approach might be to import the original pattern from an
> image file, turn it into spatial polygons, then rasterize it,
> completely ignoring the hexagonal nature of the original. With some
> playing with the raster grid size, you could probably get a decent
> approximation.
>
> Sarah
>
>
> On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 10:40 AM, chris english
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > Thank you Ben!, I'll actually send her directly
> > to Sarah, http://www.sarahgoslee.com/ .
> > Dr. Massa, meet Dr. Goslee, Professor of indeterminate studies & weaver,
> > and writer,
> > Dr. Goslee, meet Dr. Massa, cognitive neuro research scientist, felter
> and
> > loom beader.
> > Thanks again,
> > Chris
> >
> > On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 9:12 AM, Ben Tupper <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> If I were in your shoes I would be doing a hop-skip to ring Sarah
> Goslee's
> >> doorbell.  She's our resident ecology-spatial-textiles guru...
> >>
> >> http://www.stringpage.com/
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Jul 29, 2018, at 12:26 AM, chris english <
> [hidden email]>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> My wife showed me a beading pattern that she was working on that looks
> to
> >> my eye like a hexagonal grid, its called a peyote stitch, and she needs
> to
> >> transform it to a loom stitch, essentially a raster. In the beading
> world
> >> they suggest combining two rows into one. If asked, what have you
> tried, I
> >> would say I tried to duck, but... In practical application, the two rows
> >> equals one doesn't appear to preserve the desired pattern when beading
> the
> >> loom, probably something like netting out the half-steps when you're
> going
> >> from two rows to one = n+1 or n +2 for bead count on the combined row.
> >> 40x40 hex grid, OK, I'll get out my graph paper. Summer.
> >>
> >> Thank you for your forbearance, and any very general thoughts
> appreciated,
> >> ie transforms sans datums & etc.
> >>
> >> Chris
> >>
>

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